Article Index

Book Review-The Legacy of Hurricane Mitch: Lessons from Post-Disaster Reconstruction in Honduras

Authors
Carla S. Prater
Issue
November 2010
Description
The Legacy of Hurricane Mitch: Lessons from Post-Disaster Reconstruction in Honduras\r\nAuthor: Marisa O. Ensor\r\nReviewed by: Carla S. Prater\r\nPages: 395-397

Book Review - The Politics of Protection: The Limits of Humanitarian Action

Authors
Ilan Kelman
Issue
August 2011
Description
The Politics of Protection: The Limits of Humanitarian Action, 2011, Elizabeth G. Ferris, Washington DC: Brookings Institute.

Book Review: The Routledge Handbook of Hazards and Disaster Risk Reduction

Authors
Shabana Khan
Issue
March 2013
Description
Published 2012, edited by Ben Wisner, JC Gaillard, and Ilan Kelman. London: Routledge.

Book Review: Vulnerable India: A Geographical Study of Disasters

Authors
Himanshu Grover
Issue
March 2011
Description
Book Review: Vulnerable India: A Geographical Study of Disasters

Book Review: Women Confronting Natural Disasters: From Vulnerability to Resilience

Authors
Sara Hamideh
Issue
March 2015
Description
Published 2012, by Elaine Enarson. Boulder, CO: Lynne Reinner Publishers Inc.

Book Review: Women, Gender and Disaster: Global Issues and Initiatives

Authors
Carla Prater
Issue
August 2011
Description
Women, Gender and Disaster: Global Issues and Initiatives, 2009, edited by Elaine Enarson and PB. Dhar Chakrabarti, Thousand Oaks CA: Sage Publications.

Books Reviews

Authors
John A. Cross, John K. Schorr, Russell R. Dynes, Patricia A. Bolton, John Oliver
Issue
August 1993
Description
Environmental Management and Urban Vulnerability.\r\n\r\nInspiration: Come to the Headwaters: Proceedings of the Fifteenth Annual Conference of the Association of State Floodplain Managers, June 10-14\r\n\r\nKatastrophe and Katastrophenschutz: Eine Soziologische Analyse.\r\n\r\nThe First Fifteen Years: Australia\\'s Natural Disasters Organization.\r\n\r\nSocial Crises Contingencies at the Local and State Government Levels.\r\n\r\nOrganizational and Community Response to a Technological Emergency: Case Study of a Major Incident within a Metropolitan Australian City.\r\n\r\nThe Army Corps of Engineers and the Evolution of Federal Floodplain Management Policy.

Breaking Rules to Be Compassionate: The 'Skillful Means' of Buddhist Relief after the Wenchuan Earthquake Disaster

Authors
Pu Chengzhong
Issue
March 2015
Description
In the aftermath of the 2008 Great Wenchuan Earthquake, China, the ancient Buddhist Luohan Monastery became an important locus for disaster relief services. This included becoming a temporary maternity ward as the nearby hospital was badly damaged. This paper examines the monastery’s relief efforts as a case of socially engaged Buddhism. It pays particular attention to the ways in which the head monk of the monastery, Shi Suquan, negotiated tensions between responding to the desperate needs of nearby residents and long-standing religious rules and taboos which, on the surface at least, stood in opposition to certain forms of relief practices. The paper argues that he used Buddhist doctrines, particularly the Mahāyāna concept of ‘skillful means,’ to renegotiate the taboos by privileging the ethical imperative of compassionate action.

Bridging the Divide from Theory to Practice

Authors
Jim Stuart-Black, Eve Coles, Sarah Norman
Issue
November 2005
Description
Increasing exposure to hazards and their associated risks coupled with escalating political, economic, social and cultural dynamics has led to a growing demand on emergency planners across the world. Historically Emergency Planning in the United Kingdom (UK) was a second or third career option, characterized by individuals with a background based in the emergency services, military or logistics (Coles, 1998), with similar attributes seen in Emergency Planners in the New Zealand (NZ) context. The UK and NZ have similar emergency planning roles however they address training and professional development needs from differing perspectives. In light of this new environment, practitioners and academics alike are faced with the challenge of ensuring today’s emergency planners are suitably educated, skilled and equipped to face the challenges of the new working environment. Since 1995 when the first United Kingdom undergraduate degree in Disaster Management came on stream at Coventry University, a number of academic undergraduate and postgraduate courses in Disaster and Emergency Management have become ever increasingly popular to both mature students and school leavers in the UK. Similarly, in New Zealand the historical approach to ‘training’ has in recent years been adapted into a suite of professional development activities including access to tertiary level qualifications and diplomas. \r\nIs it still acceptable to consider professional development simply in terms of short course attendance or should we be focusing on more contemporary academic programs as delivered by a number of tertiary organizations? Is there a gap between the theoretical (academic) approach and that of the traditional practitioner and if there is, can we bridge the divide? The historical relationship between the researcher and the practitioner in the UK and NZ appears to have been ‘never the twain shall meet’ but is that still the case? The context for developing the emergency management profession is changing. The focus of job descriptions and person specifications has changed dramatically within the last five years begging the question, what cultural change has taken place between the practitioner and the researcher and what value is placed on evidence based practice?\r\nIn answering these questions, this paper will examine the legislative frameworks in the United Kingdom and New Zealand before identifying the respective approaches to training and professional development.\r\n

Bridging the Gap between Research and Practice: The Natural Hazards Research and Applications Information Center

Authors
Mary Fran Myers
Issue
March 1993
Description
Integrating the hazards research and practitioner communities is the main goal of the Natural Hazards Research and Applications Information Center. Founded in 1975 at the University of Colorado, the center works toward its goal with four main activities: dissemination of hazards information through publication of a bi-monthly newsletter and other forms of reports, and operation of an electronic newsletter; provision of information services through maintenance of a large library and data base on natural hazards; conduct of a modest research program; and sponsorship of an annual workshop. This paper describes these activities and shows how these activities can bridge the gap between researcher and practitioner.