Article Index

Clinical Implications of Cultural Differences in Factors Influencing Resilience Following Natural Disaster: A Narrative Review

Authors
Kimberly Norris and Anbarasu S C
Issue
March 2017
Description
Purpose: In the immediate aftermath of disasters, unaffected individuals and organisations attempt to help in whatever capacity may be available to them - including the provision of mental health interventions. It is therefore important to identify the mental health outcomes of such disaster in order for such help to target culturally appropriate interventions for these populations. Objective: The objectives of this literature review were to identify and describe the mental health outcomes, interventions, and resilience or coping skills of survivors following natural disasters - namely earthquakes, hurricanes, tsunamis and floods - across different cultural settings. Methods: Due to the small number of studies identified, a narrative approach was employed to compile the data. Results: Twelve studies were identified for this review and PTSD was the most common mental health outcome identified. Even though there were some differences in resilience and coping strategies of natural disaster survivors, on a micro-environmental level, social support appeared to be common. On a macro-systemic level, community factors, such as community services, cultural factors, spirituality and religion contributed to resilience across several cultures. However, mental health interventions adopted varied across different cultures. Conclusion: Mental health professionals can increase the extent to which they are viewed by victims as a viable source of assistance following a disaster by being aware of the impacts of culture and social class on mental health outcomes. Furthermore, targeting diversity among group members in the planning of disaster mental health services can likewise increase the trust with which diverse ethnic groups view mental health professionals. In essence, mental health professionals have to be innovative and think outside the box to meet the needs of disaster victims.

Collective Behavior Research in the Netherlands: From Residual to Partnership

Authors
Uriel Rosenthal
Issue
August 1986
Description
Till recently, the study of collective behavior did not pose as a distinct field in Dutch social science. During the era of pillarization and consociational democracy (1917-1967) the main thrust of social and political research involved organizational factors in social and political life rather than the irregular dynamics of panics, crazes and hostile outbursts. Noninstitutional, unscheduled phenomena were not en vogue among opinion leaders and social scientists alike.

College Student Disaster Risk, Fear and Preparedness

Authors
Michelle L. Tate, William E. Lovekamp
Issue
August 2008
Description
This research examines college students’ perceived risk of tornados and earthquakes affecting their college residence and community, fear, perceived levels of disaster preparedness and preparedness actions at a Midwestern university. Using questionnaires, we collected a sample of 192 college students from a variety of majors and class ranks. We conclude that these students do know the potential likelihood and risks of tornados and earthquakes, perceive that they are prepared for tornados but not for earthquakes, and do not take many of the appropriate actions to prepare themselves.

Command and Control: Challenging Fallacies of the ‘Military Model’ in Research and Practice

Authors
Ryan P. Burke
Issue
August 2018
Description
Disaster researchers advocate for a flexible problem-solving approach emphasizing creativity, initiative, and improvisation in disaster response. Researchers decry the rigid approach widely referred as the “military model,” or command and control. Yet practitioners often support this “command post” approach to response. Researchers and practitioners, however, fail to recognize that the model they either reject or support, respectively, is an inaccurate representation of actual military command and control in both doctrine and practice. This article compares military and disaster literature command and control archetypes and presents them as remarkably similar. In so doing, it challenges existing command and control paradigms and argues that the research view is quite similar to the true military approach. The central aim of this paper seeks to dismiss inaccurate assumptions of the command and control model while persuading critics to adopt a new and more informed assessment of the military model in its modern form.

Comment on "Can Sustainable Development Sustain Us?"

Authors
Dennis S. Mileti
Issue
August 2002
Description
No abstract

Comment on "Can Sustainable Development Sustain Us?"

Authors
John Handmer
Issue
August 2002
Description
No abstract

Comment on "Can Sustainable Development Sustain Us?"

Authors
Allen H. Barton
Issue
August 2002
Description
No abstract

Comment on Comments or What I See in Hewitt’s Mirror in Rereading My Paper

Authors
Boris N. Porfiriev
Issue
November 1995
Description
No abstract.

Comments on Drabek and Other Encyclopedists

Authors
Russell R. Dynes
Issue
August 1999
Description
No abstract.

Comments on the World Conference on Disaster Reduction (WCDR)

Authors
Sarah La Trobe, Juan Carlos Villagran Da Leon, Mark Pelling, Havidan Rodriguez, Rajib Shaw, Ben Wisner, Louise K Comfort, Salvano Briceno, Rohit Jigyasu
Issue
March 2005
Description
A number of participants (several of whom are past authors of this Journal) at the World Conference on Disaster Reduction (WCDR) 2005 were invited to write a personal comment. The authors presented here are not meant to reflect a scientifically accurate representative sample, however they do offer some insights into the span of topics of both interest and concern and also the range of views in circulation at a significant event in disaster research and practice. These contributions have received the minimum of editing and are presented in alphabetical order of author, except for the piece by Louise Comfort, which was written originally for one of the WCDR sessions and ends this selection of comments.