Article Index

The Halifax Explosion and Port Arthur Massacre: Testing Samuel Prince’s Ideas

Authors
John Handmer, Joseph Scanlon
Issue
August 2001
Description
Samuel Henry Prince wrote that major catastrophes lead to change. Despite his status in the field, there have been few attempts to examine empirically Prince’s ideas about change. In this paper the authors describe a massacre in Port Arthur, Tasmania, in 1996 in which a man armed with automatic weapons killed 35 persons and injured 19 others. As a result of the massacre, changes occurred in Australian gun-control laws. The fallout from the massacre is examined in light of Prince’s thesis about change following catastrophes.

The Impact of a Natural Disaster on the Division of Labor in Twelve Guatemalan Communities: A Study of Social Change in a Developing Country

Authors
Frederick L. Bates, Greg A. Hoover
Issue
November 1985
Description
It has been hypothesized that disasters are a type of \\"intervention\\" which affect rates of social change and provide unique opportunities to observe this process by \\"compressing\\" it into a shorter time span. This paper utilizes an interrupted time series analysis to determine the effects of an earthquake on the rate and direction of change in the division of labor in twelve Guatemalan communities. The general trend for these communities (both control and experimental) is increasing complexity before the earthquake followed by accelerated growth in complexity after the earthquake. Differences between the experimental and control communities are discussed. It is suggested that the level of complexity may be important as an underlying influence on the response of a population to a disaster. In addition, changes in complexity (which were shown to occur) also warrant further study as possible influences upon these responses.

The Impact of Disaster Education on Household Preparedness for Hurricane Hugo

Authors
Susan P. Kelley, Thomas Petee, Charles E. Faupel
Issue
March 1992
Description
This article examines the impact disaster education on hurricane preparedness among residents in Charleston, South Carolina. The article examines 1. the impact of participation in disaster education programs generally 2. the impact of hurricane experience as a type of education and 3. the impact of participation in earthquake specific education programs to determine whether there is any transference of knowledge across agent types. Two indices of preparedness are used: household planning activities, and adaptive response activities. It was found that participation in some type of disaster education program is strongly related to the preparedness measures. Hurricane experience has some minimal effect on adaptive response but not on household planning. Participation in the earthquake specific education programs is not a significant predictor when controlling for other variables.

The Impact of Gender on Humanitarian Logistics

Authors
Gyöngyi Kovács, Peter Tatham
Issue
August 2010
Description
Logistics performance in the humanitarian context has been linked to gender issues in several ways. From the perspective of the beneficiary, gender-based disaster vulnerabilities and gender disparities in accessing aid have been highlighted. However, the gender of humanitarian staff in contact with beneficiaries, making purchasing decisions, and responsible for last-mile deliveries, i.e., humanitarian logisticians, also impacts on the way in which the needs of female and male beneficiaries are met. This conceptual article focuses, therefore, on the links between gender, logistics performance, and logistics skills—discussing the implications of these three areas in the humanitarian context. From this, an agenda for further research is proposed.

The Impact of Intergovernmental Distance on Disaster Communications

Authors
Charles J. Givans, Deborah L. Steel, Llewellyn M Toulmin
Issue
August 1989
Description
Previous research into disaster communications, while fairly extensive, has been limited primarily to sociological analysis and organizational theory. This body of research, however, has not explored disaster communications in a federal, international or other multi-level governmental response system. This paper expands upon existing research to present a new theory of intergovernmental disaster communications.

The Impact of the Browning Prediction on Institutions

Authors
Judith A. Golec
Issue
November 1993
Description
An association of circumstance: the 1990 Browning Earthquake prediction and the center for Earthquake Research and Information.

The Intersection of Gender and Social Class in Disaster: Balancing Resilience and Vulnerability

Authors
Maureen Fordham
Issue
March 1999
Description
Those who experience disaster are widely regarded as an undifferentiated group, labeled “victims.” In the immediate crisis period, it is difficult for professionals to differentiate, except crudely, between varying levels of need and still carry out urgent duties and responsibilities. However, it soon becomes apparent that some are hit harder than others and that disaster are not the great levelers they are sometimes considered to be. Close examination reveals complex variations within, and not just between, social groups broadly understood as middle- and working-class. This paper examines the intersection of gender and social class in two major flood events and argues for a more nuanced appreciation of these factors, and both the conceptual and the practical level, to be incorporated throughout the disaster process.

The Inventory’s Legacy for the next Generation

Authors
Jennifer Wilson
Issue
August 1999
Description
A-5\r\nAugust 1999, Vol. 17, No. 2, pp. 217-221\r\nTitle: The Inventory’s Legacy for the next Generation\r\nAuthor(s): Jennifer Wilson\r\n

The Long Shadow of Disaster: Memory and Politics in Holland and Sweden

Authors
Susann Ullberg, Paul t Hart, Celesta K Bos
Issue
March 2005
Description
The Long Shadow of Disaster: Memory and Politics in Holland and Sweden\r\nAuthor(s): Celesta Kofman Bos, Susann Ullberg, Paul t Hart\r\nPages: 5-26

The Media in Disaster Threat Situations: Some Possible Relationships Between Mass Media Reporting and Voluntarism

Authors
Brenda Phillips
Issue
November 1986
Description
This research looks at possible relationships between mass media reporting and voluntarism in disaster-threat situations. The setting is a small mid-western city int he United States which was inundated by flood waters in March 1982. Data were collected through interviews with volunteers, organizational and public officials, and the media. Additionally, numerous documents pertaining to the media and volunteers are content analyzed. Observations made on-site supplement the interviews and documents.\r\nThe media are found to have some effect in accordance with the suggestions of dependency theory. The media are also found to have been one of several investigators of increased voluntarism. Conflict arising out of media depiction of the volunteer effort is discussed. Further research on media effects of voluntarism in disaster situations is suggested.